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January 10th, 2018:

Interview with Alex Triantaphyllis

Alex Triantaphyllis

There are a lot of reasons why CD07 has drawn so much national attention. It’s a district Hillary Clinton won in 2016 despite being held by Republicans forever – this was Poppy Bush’s seat back in the day, for goodness’ sake. It’s the home of the kind of well-educated non-Trump Republicans that are, or could be, swinging Democratic. And it features two Democratic challengers who have been outraising the incumbent. Atop that list is Alex Triantaphyllis, who is the Director of Immigration and Economic Opportunity at BakerRipley (formerly Neighborhood Centers). Triantaphyllis is a Rice graduate who has also worked in finance and consulting, and you can hear me pronounce his name correctly (the accent is on the second syllable; there was a pronunciation guide on a whiteboard at his campaign office where we spoke) in the interview:

You can see all of my Congressional interviews as well as finance reports and other information on candidates on my 2018 Congressional Election page.

Judicial Q&A: Michele Chimene

(Note: As I have done in past elections, I am running a series of Q&As for judicial candidates in contested Democratic primaries. This is intended to help introduce the candidates and their experiences to those who plan to vote in March. I am running these responses in the order that I receive them from the candidates. You can see other Q&As and further information about judicial candidates on my 2018 Judicial page.

Michele Chimene

1. Who are you and what are you running for?

My name is Michele Chimene. I’m a long-time resident of Houston, Katy, and Sugar Land. I am running for Place 8 on the Fourteenth Court of Appeals. The Fourteenth Court is the intermediate court, hearing civil, criminal, and family appeals in 10 counties centering around Harris County.

2. What kind of cases does this court hear?

This court hears criminal, civil, and family law appeals from the trial court. It also hears special cases called “original proceedings.”

3. Why are you running for this particular bench?

I am running for this bench because, as a 25-yr appeals lawyer, I read the opinions that are issued by the incumbent, and I believe that he sometimes deletes parts of the law, substituting in his own words instead of the law, to make the results of the case different than they would be if the actual law was applied. I believe that the law should be predicable and fair, with a “level playing field” for everyone.

4. What are your qualifications for the job?

I have been an appellate attorney for twenty-five years. While I also have trial experience, I believe that experience as an appellate attorney, researching the law and writing common sense arguments clearly and understandably is the best experience for becoming an appellate justice. I also believe that I am a good listener, and that everyone who comes into my court will get listened to politely and courteously.

5. Why is this race important?

Because the Texas Supreme Court and Court of Criminal Appeals do not hear every case that petitions them. For many cases in this large chunk of Texas, the Fourteenth Court will be the highest court that hears them, and their final chance to receive unbiased justice. Voters should not skip voting in this race, because it is a chance to elect someone who is not a professional politician but who has the legal skills to give the thousands, (yes, thousands), of parties who come before her during her term the predictable, law-based justice they seek.

6. Why should people vote for you in the primary?

Experience and character matter. My twenty-five years of appellate experience are more relevant experience than the incumbent had before he was elected to the bench. Most candidates for the Court of Appeals come to the Court with only civil case experience. My broad experience includes all the types of law the court handles. Additionally, my prior career as a geologist gives me the technical background that will be helpful to the Court as it takes on technically-challenging cases. My character matters. I will follow the law as long as the Constitution allows, and if Texas law differs from the Constitution, I will follow the Constitution. Our country was founded as a nation of laws. We need to get back to that. I will be predictable.

And then there were nine

One Democratic gubernatorial hopeful is now off the ballot.

Demetria Smith, a Democrat who had hoped to challenge Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in the 2018 gubernatorial race, has been determined ineligible to run.

Smith, who attended a San Angelo forum for candidates in the Democratic primary Monday evening, was listed ineligible on the Texas Secretary of State’s website. The Texas Democratic Party said Tuesday that Smith’s check for a $3,750 candidate filing fee had bounced, said Glen Maxey, primary director of the party.

To run for governor in Texas, candidates must pay the filing fee or file a petition with 5,000 signatures.

Maxey said Smith filed Dec. 11, the last filing day, with a personal check that was deposited the following day, on Dec. 12; however, the party was not notified of the insufficient funds until Monday.

Because the deadline to pay the fee has passed, Smith cannot correct the error.

[…]

Smith, who called herself as the “constitutional candidate” at the forum, said in a phone interview after hearing the news: “I will be challenging the constitutionality of their decision,” referring to the Texas Democratic Party.

“If you accept the check on the last day, you should be able to clear it,” she said.

Smith is a perennial candidate who has run for Council (2.71% in District D, 2013) and Mayor (0.47% in 2015) and other things here in Houston. She was likely headed towards a 2-3% showing in the primary. As I’ve said before, the terms and conditions for getting on the ballot are pretty well known, and anyone who files on deadline day takes the risk that something will go wrong for which there is no time to make a correction. Smith could file a lawsuit to get back on the ballot, though it’s not clear to me what the basis of such a suit would be. My guess is that this is the end of the road for her, but I suppose anything can happen. The DMN and the Chron have more on this story and on that candidate forum.