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January 19th, 2018:

Friday random ten – Come, come now, part 2

Keep it coming.

1. Come Go With Me – Georgetown Chimes
2. Come In, Sit Down – Jiggernaut
3. Come On (Part III) – Stevie Ray Vaughan
4. Come On Eileen – Dexy’s Midnight Runners
5. Come On With Me – The Mollys
6. Come Out Ye Black And Tans – Larkin
7. Come Saturday – The Pains of Being Pure At Heart
8. Come To Jesus – Mindy Smith
9. Come To Mama – Pete Townshend
10. Come To Me – Bonnie Raitt

Have I mentioned before that my sister Eileen really hated the song “Come On Eileen” when we were kids? Because she sure did. And when did the expression “Come to Jesus”, to refer to a serious conversation, come to mean that?

Judicial Q&A: Lucia Bates

(Note: As I have done in past elections, I am running a series of Q&As for judicial candidates in contested Democratic primaries. This is intended to help introduce the candidates and their experiences to those who plan to vote in March. I am running these responses in the order that I receive them from the candidates. You can see other Q&As and further information about judicial candidates on my 2018 Judicial page.

Lucia Bates

1. Who are you and what are you running for?

My name is Lucia Bates and I am a candidate for Justice of the Peace Precinct 3 Place 2.

2. What kind of cases does this court hear?

  • This Court hears Criminal misdemeanors punishable by fine only (no confinement)
  • Civil actions of not more than $10,000
  • Small Claims
  • Eviction repair and remedy
  • Truancy and Magistrate functions.

3. Why are you running for this particular bench?

I love my community and believe that I have the temperament, integrity and experience to make a positive difference.

4. What are your qualifications for this job?

According to Texas State Law: In order to be a Justice of the Peace:

Candidates must be Texas residents for one year, residents of the district they will serve in for six months, a U.S. citizen and 18 years old. Justices of the Peace serve four-year terms. JPs do not need to have a law degree, or any degree.

I have been a resident of Precinct 3 for 40 years:

  • Immediate Past Chairman- North Channel Chamber of Commerce – Board Member for 6 years
  • Director- North Shore Rotary – 2 years
  • President – Plantations of Wood Forest – New Forest Subdivision – Board Member 12 years
  • Advisory Committee – San Jacinto College North Business Mgmt./Entrepreneurship – 4 years
  • Advisory Committee – Galena Park ISD / Channelview ISD / Sheldon ISD – 4 years
  • Community Advisory Panel to Lyondell-Equistar – 4 years
  • Board Member – Wendell D Lay – YMCA – 2 years
  • Advisor – Top Teens of America – 5 years
  • Past Board Director – San Jacinto Pilot Club – 2 yrs.
  • MBA – University of Phoenix
  • BBA – University of Houston – Clear Lake

5. Why is this race important?

This race is very important because the Constituents have an opportunity to vote for a candidate who has a vested interest in the community, is willing to collaborate with various organizations and increase confidence in the court system.

6. Why should people vote for you in the primary?

I love my community and have worked tirelessly for 30 years within various community organizations to make a positive impact. I am accessible and would like the opportunity to leverage my experiences, enhance the services to the community and continue to lead with fairness and integrity.

No Amazon HQ2 for Houston

Never really expected that we’d be a top contender, to be honest.

Amazon ruled out Houston as a candidate for its $5 billion second headquarters on Thursday, delivering a blow to local leaders who had hoped to lure the Seattle tech giant to a four-mile stretch between downtown and the Texas Medical Center.

The largest U.S. online retailer whittled down more than 200 proposals from North America cities to just 20, eliminating Houston but keeping the city’s longtime rivals Austin and Dallas on its short list.

Amazon’s decision marks a setback for local leaders including the Greater Houston Partnership, which led an effort last fall to pitch the city as an attractive market for the company to set down stakes.

“I believe this is a wake-up call for Houston,” GHP CEO Bob Harvey said in a statement. “While there has been growing momentum in the innovation space over the last couple of years, this is a clear indication that we have much more work to do as a region to grow our digital economy.”

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner called Amazon’s decision ” disappointing and heartbreaking.:

But, he added, “It serves as a wake-up call that we must move at a much quicker pace. The city is well positioned, but it’s also is an indication that there is a lot of work that still needs to be done.”

[…]

In his statement Thursday, Harvey said Houston should focus on developing the Innovation Corridor and its technology sector further. He also said Houston should move forward with the proposed Houston Data Science Institute, a data center recently announced by the University of Houston.

“While we are the number one market in the country for STEM talent, we need to bolster our pipeline of digital tech talent that is relevant to tomorrow’s digital economy,” Harvey said. “This means working with our higher education partners across the region to develop and invest in programs that will produce the talent we need to succeed.”

But economists warned that Houston would rank low on Amazon’s wish list in the nationwide bidding war for a campus that could bring 50,000 jobs, saying the city lacked a robust public transportation system. Only 2 percent of the local population takes public transportation to work, according to Census data.

See here and here for some background. On the one hand, it’s always a bummer to miss out. On the other hand, I wasn’t excited at the thought of giving zillions of dollars in incentives and tax breaks to a behemoth like Amazon as deal-sweeteners. There’s too much of that going on already. Doing things like developing the Innovation Corridor and building a Data Science Institute, that’s fine and worthwhile as investments. And let’s be sure not to overlook the feedback about our public transportation infrastructure. Imagine where we could have been if we’d had a Congressional delegation that was unanimous in its support of of more robust transit system. We’ll have an opportunity to support that at the ballot box this November. If we’re serious about wanting to be more competitive with the cities we lost out to, we need to put our money where our mouths are. The Trib, Texas Monthly (which is very skeptical of the chase to lure in Amazon), Swamplot, and the Dallas Observer have more.

HuffPo on Gina Ortiz Jones

I do love national stories about our Congressional candidates.

Gina Ortiz Jones

Gina Ortiz Jones thought she could work for President Donald Trump.

When he won the presidency in November 2016, Jones, a career civil servant who served in the Air Force in Iraq under George W. Bush and as an intelligence officer under Barack Obama, stayed in her job as a director in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative. But by June, she couldn’t do it anymore. Trump’s plans to gut education and housing aid hit too close to home for Jones, as someone who relied on reduced-cost school lunches and subsidized housing when she was a kid being raised by a single mom in San Antonio. She was also appalled by the president’s hires for top jobs.

“The type of people that were brought in to be public servants were interested in neither the public nor the service,” Jones, 36, said in an interview. “That, to me, was a sign that I’m going to have to serve in a different way.”

She found a new way to serve: She’s running for Congress. Jones has never run for office before, and if she wins, she would make history as the first lesbian, Iraq War veteran and first-generation Filipina-American to hold a U.S. House seat in Texas. Her hometown district, Texas’ 23rd, has also never been represented by a woman.

Jones wouldn’t have been able to grow up healthy or get an education without the opportunities she got from the federal government, she said. The only reason she could afford college, she added, was that she got a four-year Air Force ROTC scholarship — and it infuriates her to see politicians try to take away those chances for others.

“Talent is universal. Opportunity is not,” she said. “Folks in Congress, they do three things. They create opportunities, they protect opportunities and they erase opportunities. That’s how we have to be thinking about this very plainly.”

[…]

Jones expressed frustration that [incumbent Rep. Will] Hurd routinely votes against his constituents’ interests but seems to get away with it because of his reputation for being “the nice guy.” Last year, Hurd gave people warm fuzzies about bipartisanship by live-streaming a 1,600-mile road trip with Texas Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke. HuffPost thought it looked fun (even if it was a political calculation by O’Rourke, who proposed the trip and announced a Senate run weeks later). Jones scoffed.

“When bipartisanship means two dudes get in a car and help each other get elected, we’re all fucking screwed,” she said.

Instead, Jones ran through Hurd’s record. He voted to delay the implementation of smog reduction measures by eight years, despite 1 in 13 Texans having asthma (with even higher rates in communities of color, like his). He voted nine times to repeal the Affordable Care Act. He voted for the GOP’s tax bill, which benefits the rich and raises taxes on middle-class families over time. He’s been quiet about Congress’ failure to renew funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which is set to expire and would affect 400,000 kids in Texas.

It’s particularly outrageous that Hurd hasn’t signed onto a bipartisan bill, the Dream Act, to preserve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Jones said. Trump ended the program in September, and young undocumented immigrants will begin losing protections in greater numbers in March unless Congress passes a law to keep it. If lawmakers fail to act, hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants are at risk of being deported.

Jones said the uncertainty around DACA is “a huge deal” in Texas’ 23rd District, where more than 70 percent of constituents are Latino.

“So I push back on the fact that some say, ‘Oh, he’s not that bad.’ His voting record is awful,” she said. “You don’t get to be a moderate just because you don’t say crazy shit.”

I’ve always kind of admired candidates who are willing to cuss on the record. I also think that’s the right way to attack Hurd, whose moderate reputation is based in large part on sounding less extreme than his colleagues. As noted before, Jones has a tough fight in the primary before she gets to take on a tough fight in November. She’s picked up a lot of establishment support, and I hope to see that reflected in her Q4 finance report. If she does win the primary, she’ll have a very high profile going forward. Keep an eye on her.

Endorsement watch: Fast out of the gate

Another thing that has no doubt been affected by the tons of candidates running for office this year: The Chron’s endorsement process, which got off to a necessarily early start yesterday as they recommended candidates in a couple of open-seat judicial races.

Jason Luong

District Judge, 185th Judicial District: Jason Luong

Voters can’t go wrong in this primary race for an open seat but our nod goes to the more experienced candidate, Jason Luong, a practicing attorney for 18 years. Luong left a civil law practice to become a prosecutor and in 2014 unsuccessfully ran for a county criminal court-at-law seat. He now works as a defense attorney. Luong’s resume checks all the prestige boxes: graduated cum laude from Rice University, law degree from the University of Texas, a clerkship with a federal district judge and an internship with the Texas Supreme Court. He likes to tout the fact that he prosecuted a member of Aryan Brotherhood under Texas’s hate crime statute, but Luong, 43, also recognizes that the reality of our criminal courts means that, as he told the editorial board, “administration of justice is often about logistics.” Anyone who has seen the lines for the elevator at the Harris County Criminal Justice Center knows how true that is.

His opponent, Brennen Dunn, is a compelling candidate in his own right, and we’ll be disappointed if we don’t see his name on the ballot again.

Dunn hasn’t been afraid to take risky positions in defense of liberty, such his involvement in efforts to end a civil injunction “safety zone” at the Southlawn apartments. He also has a charisma that would make him a prime candidate to run for a seat outside the judiciary, say for City Council. Dunn told us he is in the race because as a defense attorney, he can help one person at a time, while as a judge, he believes he can help hundreds. Notwithstanding Dunn’s impressive motivation, Luong’s well-rounded background, attitude of public spiritedness and his thoughtfulness about the problems facing the judiciary earn our endorsement.

There was also an endorsement on the Republican side of this race, as well as in another race where the Democrats have an uncontested primary. Here’s Brennen Dunn’s Q&A; Jason Luong hasn’t submitted one yet, but he did in 2014. Given that early voting starts in exactly one month (!), I figure we’ll be seeing endorsements more or less every day from the Chron from now till it’s over.