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October 19th, 2018:

Judicial Q&A: Tanya Garrison

(Note: As I have done in past elections, I am running a series of Q&As for Democratic judicial candidates. This is intended to help introduce the candidates and their experiences to my readers. I am running these responses in the order that I receive them from the candidates. You can see other Q&As and further information about judicial candidates on my 2018 Judicial page.

Tanya Garrison

1. Who are you and what are you running for?

I am Tanya Garrison and am running for the 157th Judicial District Court. I am a New Mexico native that moved to Houston in 1997. I am a Mom, Wife, Daughter, Sister, Aunt, and Friend to some of the most amazing people in the world.

2. What kind of cases does this court hear?

Civil cases in which one of the parties is seeking monetary relief in an amount of money in excess of $500, some sort of equitable relief, or declaratory relief.

3. Why are you running for this particular bench?

I have the experience necessary to be a great civil court judge. I also have the right perspective. believing that all people truly come into the court as equals regardless of race, national origin, immigration status, gender, sexual orientation or identity, education, wealth, or any other life circumstance. I also have the passion for this job as a true believer in the judicial system and the right to a trial by jury.

I believe that being a great judge in the courtroom is only part of the job. With great power comes great responsibility. I believe that anyone given the privilege of serving the community as a district court judge also has a responsibility to give back, and this comes through work with the bar association, pro bono efforts, and the community in general. I know the importance of mentoring and helping others in the profession. This is especially true when it comes to valuing the voices of women and minorities in the courtroom.

4. What are your qualifications for this job?

I have been practicing trial law for 18 years. I am Board Certified in Civil Trial Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. I am a member of the American Board of Trial Advocates and the Texas Association of Civil Trial and Appellate Specialists. In 2011, I was awarded the Woodrow B. Seals Outstanding Young Lawyer Award. I am a Past President of the Houston Young Lawyers Association and on the Board of Directors of the Houston Volunteer Lawyers Program.

5. Why is this race important?

A citizen's mostly likely contact with an elected official is in the courtroom. If someone is involved in a civil dispute, an accident in which legal action is required, employment discrimination, or a dispute with the taxing authority the presiding judge of a court like the 157th will be one of the most important people in their case. The judge involved in any case sets a tone for the entire proceeding, and people and advocates should know that they are going to get a fair trial. They should be confident that the judge has the necessary experience and the required empathy to fairly adjudicate the dispute and treat everyone with respect.

6. Why should people vote for you in November?

I can best summarize the reasons to vote for me in three points: (1) passion for the work; (2) experience; and (3) perspective.

    Passion.

  I truly love being a trial lawyer and working in the courtroom.  I respect all parts of the process and believe that when the law is applied equally, the right result is possible.  Being a Judge is my dream. 

    Experience.

  I have practiced civil trial law since I graduated law school in 2000 and have been a part of trial teams with over 20 commercial cases going to a full jury verdict.  I am Board Certified in Civil Appellate Law, and have almost 45 appeals with my name on them. 

    Perspective.

  I am someone who sincerely believes that the greatest part of our government is its people.  The strength of our judiciary comes from the diversity of our people coming together to participate in our jury system.  I am a lifelong Democrat who values all backgrounds and life experiences.  I want to create a courtroom experience that welcomes everyone despite the fact that courtrooms and the controversies that are resolved there are intimidating and difficult.  Everyone is entitled to a fair and impartial trial, and it is my goal to ensure that they get one.

Interview with Scott Cubbler

Scott Cubbler

If you’ve followed this blog in election seasons, you know that while I interview all comers in odd numbered years, I generally (with rare exceptions) limit myself to Democratic candidates in even numbered years. I’m a Democratic precinct chair, and especially in this state I want to promote our side. Today I’m making one of those rare exceptions, for an old friend. Scott Cubbler was a classmate of mine at Trinity University. I’d lost touch with him till I saw that he was running as a write-in candidate for President in 2016. He’s an independent candidate for Congress in CD02 this year, and he reached out to me for an interview. I was up front about my support for Todd Litton in CD02, he was fine with that, and so we talked. Cubbler was an officer in the Marines for a decade, and served as the Counter Terror Training Director for the New York State Office of Homeland Security, and as a Supervisory Protective Security Advisor for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He now has a construction business in Houston. Here’s our conversation:

You can see all of my interviews for Congress so far as well as other information about the candidates on my 2018 Congressional page.

Trump’s slightly less tiny Ted rally

It’s true what they say, size does matter.

Not Ted Cruz

President Donald Trump’s rally Monday in Houston with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz has been moved to a bigger venue.

Originally set to take place at the NRG Arena, the event will now be held at the Toyota Center, Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale announced in a tweet Thursday afternoon, describing the demand for tickets as “HUGE and unprecedented.” The Toyota Center can hold about twice as many people as NRG Arena — roughly 10,000 versus 19,000.

Trump set expectations high set two months ago, when he announced he would come to Texas in October to hold a rally with Cruz at the “biggest stadium we can find.” Neither NRG Arena nor the Toyota Center are among the state’s largest venues.

See here for the background. I’m sorry, this will never be not funny to me. I should have something more intelligent to say, but I’m too busy giggling.

Endorsement watch: Incumbency is no advantage, part 1

A trio of Congressional endorsements, beginning with Steven David in CD08:

Steven David

A Democratic candidate hasn’t run for the 8th Congressional District since 2012, so no doubt this will be an uphill battle. Nevertheless, voters should back challenger Steven David for this sizable north Houston seat, which stretches north from The Woodlands to Trinity, Houston, Grimes, Madison and the southern half of Leon County.

David, 34, is a Houston City Hall staffer who has focused on rooting out waste and abuse in local government. He’s running to ensure that Congress protects the best parts of the Affordable Care Act, including guaranteed coverage for maternity and newborn care, and chronic disease management.

For David, health care is a personal matter. He and his wife were foster parents of an infant child whose mother had done ecstasy, a methamphetamine, while pregnant. The baby was born with digestive and skin problems and needed routine medical care. However, the Medicaid program that paid to help keep the infant healthy and alive would have been cut under 11-term incumbent U.S. Rep. Kevin Brady’s plan to repeal and replace the ACA, David told us.

That’s why he jumped into this race.

He also wants to expand student loan forgiveness programs and improve government efficiency — similar to his job at City Hall. It’s a solid agenda worth endorsing.

What really convinced us, however, is a quote from President Lyndon Johnson.

After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the newly ascendant Johnson made it his top priority to pass Kennedy’s civil rights bill. When his aides tried to dissuade him from pursuing such a politically risky agenda, he replied, “Well, what the hell is the presidency for?”

We find ourselves asking a similar question about the chairmanship of the House Ways and Means Committee.

The Chron notes that they have regularly endorsed incumbent Rep. Kevin Brady – you will note that this is a recurring theme – but have had enough from someone who had a lot of power to do good and has chosen instead to use that power for provincial partisan interests. As they said, what good is being powerful if you don’t use it well? (See also Lizzie Fletcher’s argument against Appropriations Committee member John Culberson.)

Next, MIke Siegel in CD10:

Mike Siegel

Consider us impressed with a campaign that fought for and succeeded in protecting voting rights even before winning an election.

This is a tough call because we’re fans of incumbent U.S. Rep. Mike McCaul, but in this race Siegel has our endorsement.

An assistant city attorney in Austin, Siegel, 40, wants to strengthen the Affordable Care Act, though he told us ideally he’d prefer single-payer health care.

He thinks the federal government has failed to make the proper investments in flood control infrastructure. That includes a coastal storm surge protection at the Port of Houston, which is outside his district but, as he recognizes, is key to the national economy. He’s also pushing for a pragmatic immigration plan similar to the 2013 bipartisan Senate bill.

Siegel has a specific focus on helping the rural parts of this district. He pointed to preventing rural hospitals from closing and expanding high-speed Internet access outside cities. Overall he’s running on a New Deal-style policy and wants to see the return of national public works projects.

The Chron noted their recent endorsements of McCaul, then called him out for remaining silent while Donald Trump has made a mockery of foreign policy. “He wouldn’t put up with what he’s tolerating from Trump if Barack Obama were still president,” they conclude. Hard to argue with that.

Last but certainly not least, Dayna Steele in CD36:

Dayna Steele

Steele has a contagious energy, impressive fundraising and undeniable communication skills that has some political observers looking at this typically deep-red district with renewed interest. She also has the ability to get [David] Crosby and [Melissa] Etheridge to show up for campaign concerts, which has classic rock fans paying attention.

She’s running against two-term incumbent Brian Babin, who has thorough experience in local government, including time as mayor of Woodville. He’s a dentist for his day job. In Congress he chairs the Space Subcommittee of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology and in that role is getting more money for manned space flight, the Johnson Space Center’s specialty.

We like Babin and were particularly glad when he helped a space program that has been somewhat adrift, which explains why we have endorsed him before. But he’s on the wrong side of too many issues, including the complete pass he gave Trump for his sleazy personal behavior.

“I don’t think anyone thought Trump was going to be a saint,” he told us.

Maybe not, but we like Steele’s policy proposals and her focus on how the government can and should help people who don’t live in major economic centers. It’s a reminder of why New Deal Democrats were popular in Texas for so many years.

Wasting one’s power, remaining silent when speaking up was needed, and just plain being wrong. Those are three good reasons to not support candidates. Having three good alternative options sure helps a lot, too. And for good measure, throw in the DMN’s endorsement of Mike Collier for Lite Guv, for which all three of those reasons apply. My interview with Steven David is here, with Mike Siegel is here, and with Dayna Steele is here. All three are decided underdogs (Siegel slightly less so than the others), but at least the voters have a real choice in each of those races.