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Episcopal Health Foundation

Harvey’s lingering health effects

It’s going to be a long time before we can really say we have put Hurricane Harvey behind us.

Three months after Hurricane Harvey, local health officials now are beginning to see the storm after the storm.

In Harris County and the other hardest-hit regions of Texas, 17 percent of those who had houses damaged or suffered income loss report that someone in their household has a new or worsening health condition. A sweeping new survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Houston-based Episcopal Health Foundation shows a similar proportion feels their own mental health has worsened.

“We’re not anywhere near the end yet,” cautioned Dr. Cindy Rispin, a family physician with the Memorial Hermann Medical Group in League City.

Researchers surveyed more than 1,600 Texans in 24 affected counties to gauge their personal recovery. The report released Tuesday found a region still reeling in ways obvious and hidden.


More than four in 10 residents surveyed for the “Early Assessment of Hurricane Harvey’s Impact on Vulnerable Texans in the Gulf Coast Region” report said their homes had hurricane damage. Three percent reported their homes were destroyed.

Among those whose homes were damaged, nearly half said they had homeowners’ or renters’ insurance, but only 23 percent had flood insurance.

“We’re going to see foreclosures hit. It will probably be people that financially were in a tight spot already,” real estate agent Matthew Guzman said in a recent interview.

Perhaps most ominous is the quiet toll Harvey is still taking, months later, on people’s physical and mental health.

Worse, many storm victims were already uninsured in a state that leads the nation in those without coverage. Even those with coverage complained they cannot afford health care, especially as longtime doctors are no longer nearby when people become displaced. About six in 10 say they have skipped or postponed needed treatment, cut back on medication or struggled to get mental health care.

An executive summary of the poll, with links to all the poll data, is here. Some sobering facts from the summary:

About half of those who have applied for disaster assistance from FEMA or the SBA say their application is still pending or has been denied, and many of those who were denied say they were not told the reason for the denial and were not given information on how to resubmit their application. About a quarter of those whose homes were damaged say they had any flood insurance. Four in ten of those who were affected say they expect none of their financial losses to be covered by insurance or other assistance.

The financial situations of most people affected by Harvey are tenuous. About half of affected residents say they have no savings whatsoever, and another quarter say that if they lost their job or other source of income, their savings would be exhausted in less than 6 months.

Nearly half of affected residents say they are not getting the help they need to recover from the hurricane. Particular areas that stand out where residents say they need more help include applying for disaster assistance and repairing damage to their homes.

Local, county, and state governments receive high marks from residents for their response to Hurricane Harvey so far. Residents are more mixed in their views of how the U.S. Congress has responded, and responses tilt negative when it comes to President Trump’s response. Four in ten affected residents are not confident relief funds will benefit those most in need.

I wish I could say people are being needlessly pessimistic, but I can’t. ThinkProgress and the Trib have more.

The Latino health insurance enrollment gap in Texas

We have made great strides in reducing the uninsured rate in Texas thanks to the Affordable Care Act, but there’s still a lot of work to do.

It's constitutional - deal with it

It’s constitutional – deal with it

The percentage of Hispanics in Texas without health insurance has dropped by 30 percent since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) went into effect, but almost one-third of Hispanic Texans ages 18 to 64 remain uninsured.

That’s one of the conclusions of a new report released today by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Episcopal Health Foundation.

The report found the uninsured rate among Hispanics ages 18 to 64 in Texas dropped from 46 percent in September 2013 to 32 percent in March 2016. But even with those gains, researchers estimate approximately 2 million Hispanics remain uninsured across the state. However, nearly half of uninsured Texas Hispanics are currently eligible to get health insurance through ACA plans or other private health insurance, the report said.

“We estimate 920,000 Hispanics are eligible for coverage now, even without Medicaid expansion or any other widespread change in coverage,” said Elena Marks, EHF’s president and CEO and a nonresident health policy fellow at the Baker Institute. “This report clearly shows the need for outreach and enrollment efforts to continue to focus on Hispanic Texans who are uninsured but eligible for coverage.”


“After three open-enrollment periods of the ACA marketplace, the uninsured rate among Hispanics is still three times that of whites,” said Vivian Ho, the chair in health economics at Rice’s Baker Institute and director of the institute’s Center for Health and Biosciences, a professor of economics at Rice and a professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. “The disparity between the two groups remains striking. The Hispanic population is growing at a faster rate than the state average, which makes it increasingly important to the entire state that Hispanics gain affordable health insurance coverage.”

The report shows that although more Hispanic Texans remain uninsured, they enrolled in ACA health insurance plans at twice the rate of whites. Researchers found 21 percent of all insured Hispanics in Texas are covered by ACA plans, compared with only 11 percent of whites across the state.

“This shows that the ACA marketplace is an important source of affordable health insurance for Hispanics,” Ho said.

The report is only nine pages, so go take a look at it. I can tell you that the main reasons for the gap are the failure to expand Medicaid, and a still-significant number of people who have not yet enrolled in any plan. The authors recommend more outreach to the latter subgroup, but that’s easier – and a lot cheaper – said than done. There are numerous community and national organizations that have done a ton of hard work informing people about their health insurance and subsidy options, but they do so in an environment where the state government is actively hostile to them. There’s a reason why some states have lowered their uninsured rates a lot more than some others.

Another story on how Texas’ uninsured rate has fallen under Obamacare

Same book, next chapter.

It's constitutional - deal with it

It’s constitutional – deal with it

A study released Tuesday shows that the rate of Texans without insurance has dropped to its lowest point since the late 1990s because of the Affordable Care Act, Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy and the Episcopal Health Foundation reported.

Prior to the implementation of the ACA in September 2013, the uninsured rate in Texas was about 26 percent – more than one in four. By this March, that rate had dropped to about 18 percent, the study said.

Researchers found declines in every age group, ethnic and racial demographic, and across income levels. Texans between the ages of 50 and 64 showed the steepest decline, dropping to 10 percent from 21 percent during that time period.

Those with low to modest incomes of $16,000 and $47,000 also showed big gains in coverage. Their rate of uninsured is now about 13 percent compared to 23 percent in 2013.

“For more than a decade prior to the ACA, the uninsured rate remained above 20 percent and was rising. It’s now clear that it’s moving in the opposite direction and the ACA deserves the credit,” Elena Marks, president and CEO of Episcopal Health Foundation, said in a statement Tuesday.

Despite progress, Texas continues to lead the nation in the number and rate of the uninsured.

In fact, the new study shines a light on a gaping hole in coverage across the state. Nearly half, or 46 percent, of Texans earning less than $16,000 per year remain uninsured, the report shows.

A copy of the report is here, and a compendium of Baker Institute research on the topic of health insurance under the ACA in Texas is here. Another recent study, by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, had Texas’ rate of uninsured residents below 17%, somewhat lower than what this one has. That may reflect a slight difference in methodology or definitions, it’s hard to say. The trend is clear, and so is the fact that by any measure, Texas is still the worst at getting its residents covered. Even among states that did not expand Medicaid, Texas’ uninsured rate is higher than average, as you can see on that first link. And yes, you can make less than $16K a year but not qualify for Medicaid in this state. Basically, unless you’re a child or you’re disabled, you’re SOL as far as that goes. But don’t worry, you can always go to the emergency room and get some service at a much higher cost to a much smaller tax base. That’s how Greg Abbott and Dan Patrick want it to be. Forbes has more.

More kids in Texas have health insurance now

Thanks, Obama!

It's constitutional - deal with it

It’s constitutional – deal with it

The number of uninsured children in Texas fell by almost 100,000 during the first year of full implementation of the Affordable Care Act, signalling a potential trend across all age groups, a new study by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation finds.

The findings were welcomed in a place with stubbornly high uninsured rates, particularly among the poor and racial and ethnic minority groups.

“This is good news. Texas is a state with a comparably young population, so the more of them that are insured the bigger the impact for the entire population,” said Elena Marks, president and CEO of Houston’s Episcopal Health Foundation.

The thought is that as parents find coverage options for their children they are more likely to learn about coverage options for themselves, which will lead to higher overall coverage rates.

In 2013, as the health-care law took hold, 977,000 Texas children were without coverage, the new research shows. That equates to 13.2 percent of the state’s under-18 population. By 2014, that uninsured rate had fallen to 11.8 percent.


Typically children are insured in greater numbers than adults since states, including Texas, offer safety net coverage through the Children’s Health Insurance Program, also known as CHIP, which provides low-cost insurance for children whose parents earn too much to qualify for Medicaid or do not have other coverage.

“Despite the politicking around health policy lately, I think we can all agree that coverage for kids is essential for their healthy development and to get a healthy start in life,” Katherine Hempstead, who directs health insurance issues for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, said in an interview Monday.

Despite the gains, 880,000 Texas children – the highest number nationally – still have no coverage.

That includes 533,000 Hispanic children, Guerra-Cardus said. She added that 94 percent of those are U.S. citizens.

The Robert Wood Johnson study shows nearly half of the nation’s 5 million uninsured children live in Texas and five other states: California, Florida, Georgia, Arizona and New York.

The research provides a baseline to track future children’s coverage trends, Hempstead said, adding that the report will be duplicated next year.

I couldn’t find a copy of the study when I looked, but there was a lot of news coverage of it out there when I googled around. It goes without saying that having healthy children is one of the best investments that a society can make, but then our state government threw 250,000 kids off of CHIP in 2003 in the name of “fiscal conservatism”, so I guess it doesn’t go without saying. There’s a reason why the reforms of the Affordable Care Act have had such a profound impact in Texas – there was so, so much that needed to be done. And as long as the current crew is in charge, there’s still so much more left to do.

Fewer Texans having trouble paying medical bills than pre-Obamacare

What else can you say but “Thanks, Obama!”

Fewer Texans say they have problems paying their medical bills in 2015 compared to 2013, according to a new report released by EHF and Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.

The report found that since enrollment began in the Affordable Care Act’s Health Insurance Marketplace (ACA), the percentage of Texans who reported problems paying health care bills dropped almost 15 percent (25.8 percent in 2013 to 22 percent in 2015). The drop was consistent across income levels and health insurance status, and corresponds with national data showing the percentage of adults reporting problems paying medical bills dropped across the U.S.

Data released this week in a nationwide Kaiser Family Foundation/New York Times survey show 26 percent of U.S. adults reported having problems paying medical bills in the past year.

“The fact that Texans had fewer problems paying their medical bills in 2015 is good news,” said Vivian Ho, the chair in health economics at Rice’s Baker Institute and director of the institute’s Center for Health and Biosciences, a professor of economics at Rice and a professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. “One reason fewer Texans are having problems paying medical bills is because more Texans now have health insurance. However, one in five Texans still has problems affording health care. And it’s no surprise our data show the uninsured and those with lower incomes continue to struggle paying those bills more than anyone else.”

The report found 30 percent of uninsured Texans reported problems paying their health care costs in 2015, down from 35 percent in 2013. Researchers found just 20 percent of those with health insurance said they had problems paying medical bills last year, down from 23 percent in 2013.

When it comes to skipping health care services because of cost, the report found uninsured Texans are more likely to skip all services (primary care, specialist care, prescription drugs, etc.) than those with insurance. However, researchers discovered fewer uninsured Texans said they skipped getting care in 2015 compared to 2013.

“On the whole, uninsured Texans reported fewer problems with affording health care in 2015,” said Elena Marks, EHF’s president and CEO, and a nonresident health policy fellow at the Baker Institute. “While our data doesn’t explain exactly why that is happening, the Texas economy improved during that time which might have helped the uninsured pay for care.”

In addition, Marks said because the number of insured patients increased across the state, more charitable care may have been available to the uninsured. New 1115 Medicaid waiver projects across Texas also may have enabled more uninsured adults to access affordable health services, Marks said.

The full report is here. Elena Marks and Vivian Ho are familiar names to anyone who’s been following health insurance news in Houston – they’ve been on this stuff since the beginning. Now just imagine how much better things could be if we’d only expand Medicaid, too.

Texas’ uninsured rate drops dramatically

Amazing what can happen when a government actually tries to solve a problem, isn’t it?

It's constitutional - deal with it

It’s constitutional – deal with it

The rate of Texans without health insurance has fallen 8 percentage points since enrollment in the federal Affordable Care Act began, according to a new study.

Texas’ sky-high rate of adults without health coverage — previously about 25 percent, the highest rate in the nation — was down to 17 percent in March, according to a report from the Episcopal Health Foundation and Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.

But Texas remains the state with the highest percentage of uninsured people, the study found, and for the first time, the state has the largest raw number of uninsured residents in the country.

The amount of change was unequal among income levels. The poorest Texans saw a less dramatic improvement — the uninsured rate for people earning less than $16,000 fell by 20 percent, while the uninsured rate for people earning more income fell by 45 percent.

In a statement, Vivian Ho, one of the study’s authors, said the survey showed a widening “coverage gap” among poor and middle-income Texans. Texas leaders have declined to expand the state’s Medicaid program to provide health insurance to impoverished adults — a central tenet of President Obama’s signature health care law — criticizing the public program as “inefficient.”

“Unless Texas participates in an expanded Medicaid program or develops some other mechanism for covering the lowest income Texans, the number who remain uninsured is not likely to change,” Ho said. “Right now, those at the lowest incomes must rely on health care that is highly subsidized by county and state tax dollars, or get by without needed health care.”

The 31 percent decrease in the rate of uninsured Texans was similar to drops in other states that did not expand Medicaid coverage. For expansion states, the average decrease in the rate of uninsured was 53 percent, according to the study.

We know how that goes. I’ve skipped the typically dishonest quote from the TPPF’s designated hack, who always manages to get quoted uncritically in this kind of story despite the fact that all he does is spread misinformation. The numbers are out there if you want to look. We also know that people like having health insurance, for reasons that should be obvious to anyone who isn’t a professional liar. It will really suck if it all gets taken away by the Supreme Court, won’t it? The Chron has more.