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September 3rd, 2017:

Weekend link dump for September 3

Just another day at the movies. No big deal.

“Why would you attempt to pull a con on a community made up of hundreds of thousands of Meddling Kids?”

The case for Taylor Swift’s new song being about Arya Stark.

“Depending on how you’ve set up two-step authentication, however, this may be far from airtight security. What’s more, not all two-step authentication methods are equally secure. Probably the most common form of secondary authentication — a one-time code sent to your mobile device via SMS/text message — is also the least secure.”

Don’t fall for Harvey-related viral hoaxes.

“Pushing civil society from talk and voting to violence and paramilitaries is what the fascists are trying to accomplish – moving from the rule of law to the rule of force.”

“When it comes to tax reform, in other words, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is hardly a profile in courage. The reason is simple: the Chamber’s own members can’t agree among themselves on what tax reform ought to include.”

“So, Bronn and Cersei Hate Each Other In Real Life”.

“One of the internet’s oldest and most popular neo-Nazi forums, which has been linked to dozens of murders, has been shut down after more than two decades of promoting white supremacy.”

“For those keeping score, this is a group of white evangelicals tripling down on the precise theology that utterly failed them in the past. Twice.”

“This is what awaits Trump on the flip side of his terrible August. It’s why anyone holding out for the possibility that Trump’s presidency might somehow become more ordinary over time is making a category error. It can’t become more ordinary, because it came into existence under unacceptable circumstances.”

“President Trump just pardoned Joe Arpaio, who was essentially running a concentration camp in the Arizona desert. He said there are some good Nazis, and he’s kicking out young adults who were brought here as kids by their parents, and I’m the one who has to continue to apologize?”

Four words: Floating fire ant colonies. You’re welcome.

Even monster trucks were pressed into rescue service during the height of Harvey.

RIP, Rollie Massimino, former head basketball coach at Villanova and author of the greatest upset in NCAA Tournament history.

“What all of this amounts to is that while Kushner has been given oversight of numerous key foreign policy issues and problems, his ‘family’ is simultaneously in a desperate hunt for money which basically has to come from abroad – from a lot of the people he meets with in his White House job. It’s like having a Secretary of State desperate for help getting money from every foreign potentate he meets with. In fact, it’s not ‘like’ that. It sort of is that.”

RIP, Jud Heathcote, former Michigan State men’s basketball coach who won an NCAA Tournament with Magic Johnson on his team.

RIP, Richard Anderson, best known as Oscar Goldman on The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman.

RIP, Walter Becker, co-founder of Steely Dan.

“So here’s what you can do. Please, please continue to love us. There are no words to express how much your encouragement means to us. But please, please think before donating.”

Many schools were damaged by Harvey

This will add so much more disruption to the Harvey recovery efforts.

More than 10,000 Houston Independent School District students are expected to start classes in temporary quarters as officials work to repair hundreds of campuses damaged by Hurricane Harvey, Superintendent Richard Carranza said Saturday.

Carranza said the district still plans to start school on Sept. 11, though officials have not yet decided which campuses will be temporarily closed or where displaced students will be sent. Those calls will be made no earlier than Tuesday, he said.

“There is that slight chance there will be a delay past Sept. 11, but we’re working with all due haste to make sure we’re going to meet that deadline,” Carranza said. “There has always been the caveat that we will not put students and staff in harm’s way.”

The damage estimates come as school districts across the Houston area struggled to open their doors after widespread flooding. Cy-Fair ISD on Saturday pushed its start date back to Sept. 11, citing sewage issues at several schools.

Humble ISD set a Sept. 7 return date, but alerted parents Saturday that Kingwood High School could be closed all year.

“Flood waters devastated KHS,” according to a notice posted on the district’s website. “The building is unsafe and unhealthy.”

[…]

In Houston ISD, at least 200 of the 245 schools inspected were found to have sustained damage, officials said. Of those, 53 sustained “major” damage and 22 had “extensive” damage, the most severe label given by district officials.

Another 30 or so schools were still being inspected, including 15 that had been inaccessible because of severe flooding around the buildings, HISD Chief Operating Officer Brian Busby said early Saturday. The district operates 280 schools.

“There may be a situation where a school is so badly damaged that we may not be able to re-open that school,” Carranza said, after a tour of waterlogged Hilliard Elementary in northeast Houston on Saturday. “It’s too early right now to make that call.”

There’s too much to try to capture in excerpts, so go read the rest. Pretty much everything is on the table – sharing school buildings with different shifts for classes, busing kids to other schools, who knows what else. How will this affect things like STAAR testing and the TEA takeover threat that the district faces? No one knows right now. It’s going to be a crazy, disjointed, bizarre year, here and in other districts. Honestly, given that some districts that were directly in the path of Harvey when it was still a hurricane are unable to function at all and will have to send their students to another district altogether, it could be worse. It’s still pretty bad, and it will be bad all year. We will get through it, but it’s going to take a lot of effort and in the end a huge amount of money.

Harvey was hard on farms, too

It wasn’t just the cities like Houston that suffered a lot of damage from Harvey.

Harvey did more than transform cityscape by turning highways into rivers; It also upended life for farmers and ranchers across dozens of counties that Gov. Greg Abbott declared disaster zones. The powerful winds and rains destroyed crops, displaced livestock and disrupted trade.

Texas typically exports nearly one-fourth of the country’s wheat and a major portion of its corn and soybeans, according to the state Department of Agriculture, but a shutdown of ports ahead of Harvey halted export.

At least 1.2 million beef cows graze in in 54 counties Abbott had added to his disaster list as of Tuesday, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. State and industry officials did not immediately have data on how many were lost, but news reports and social media have circulated images of wandering cattle and dramatic rescues of the animals from floodwaters.

[…]

Harvey also affected cropland. Texas rice producers had already harvested about 75 percent of the year’s rice crop, according to the Agriculture Department, but wind and water likely damaged storage bins, leading to more crop loses.

Harvey hit cotton farmers like Reed particularly hard, destroying their prospects of a banner year. While of region’s crops — corn, for instance, were out of the ground before the storm hit, cotton was another story.

“A lot of cotton didn’t get harvested,” said Gene Hall, a spokesman for the Texas Farm Bureau. “We know that they were racing the clock trying to beat landfall…I think anything left on the clock, you got to consider that a total loss.”

In Matagorda County, for instance, just 70 percent of cotton had been harvested, while only 35 percent was out of the ground in Wharton County, Hall said.

What’s more, high-speed winds ripped apart cotton modules — machines that pound processed cotton into rectangular blocks — leaving them strewn about fields and gin yards.

You can help farmers and ranchers affected by Harvey via the State of Texas Agriculture Relief Fund. There are a lot of small farms in the path of Harvey, and a lot of farms that supply Houston’s restaurants. One example of that is Gundermann Acres, which was completely wiped out. They farm vegetables – you’ve probably eaten some of their produce – so they can’t get crop insurance. You can help them out here if you want. As with everything else, it’s going to take all of these folks some time to recover, too.

Collin County wants its pay back

Of course they do.

Best mugshot ever

Collin County is about to start another fight over the prosecution of indicted Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton.

Since 2015, the county has been billed more than half a million dollars to prosecute Paxton, who faces securities fraud charges. But fresh off a court win that voided half of those costs, county commissioners now want the rest of their money back.

On Monday, the commissioners voted unanimously to sue for the more than $205,000 they paid the special prosecutors in January 2016. They argue that since a Dallas court struck down the prosecutors’ hourly fees — ruling they broke local and federal rules — the county should be reimbursed for all that it’s spent on the case.

See here and here for the background. What Collin County is doing is unprecedented, but that doesn’t mean they won’t get what they want. I have hope that the CCA will reverse this ridiculous ruling, but I can’t say I have faith. What I want to know is this: What happens if at some point the prosecutors say “screw this, I’m going to back to my real job”? In particular, what happens if they say this before the Paxton trial begins? I’m hard-pressed to imagine a scenario more ridiculous than Ken Paxton winning his trial by forfeit, but it could happen. What is the fallback position here, and has anyone other than me considered it?

By the way, let me also note that this is a rather extreme example of why local elections matter. Having a Democrat on Collin County Commissioners Court would not have changed the course of their actions, but it at least would have provided a voice of opposition. I don’t know what the electoral map looks like from this perspective – I may try to check it out if I can – but getting a foothold in red counties like this has got to be a priority.