Off the Kuff Rotating Header Image

A few thoughts from Opening Day

Just a few random bits from today’s festivities…

– In the end and despite the teabagger footstomping, the Speaker’s Race turned out to be a big nothingburger, which was what most rational people expected all along. There were a few deadenders, mostly Republican freshmen, who voted against Joe Straus. I can’t wait to see what kind of committee assignments some of them get, not to mention how they get treated in redistricting. Anyway, despite some speculation that they might get wooed by Team Paxton, in the end all the Democrats voted for Straus. At least they all knew enough not to go putting “Kick Me!” signs on their own posteriors.

– Putting it another way, what Harold says.

– Senate President Pro Tem Steve Ogden lays out the budget situation as he sees it. On the plus side, I am glad to see him call for reform of the business margins tax, with the apparent goal of generating more revenue. On the minus side, anyone who thinks the federal government needs a balanced budget amendment is either economically illiterate or doesn’t care that we’d have 15% or higher unemployment right now if we lived in such a world. Neither is a particularly comforting trait for a budget writer to have.

– Oh, and Ogden’s assertion that “It is impossible to balance the budget without making cuts in (education and health and human services)” is of course wrong. We can most certainly choose to raise enough revenue to do it, though I’ll agree that long term something needs to be done about Medicaid costs. (Like federalizing the program, just to pick one possibility.) The political will absolutely does not exist for this, but the point is that it’s a choice, not a physical law, that is forcing that course of action. It’s a choice the Republicans are making.

– Still having said all that, Ogden is much more in touch with reality than our Governor.

– Speaking of which, Rick Perry’s top priorities for this session are eminent domain and “sanctuary cities”. I wonder if anyone has informed Aaron Pena about this.

Robert Miller predicted that the Senate’s traditional 2/3 rule would remain unchanged. Paul Burka suggested it might be tweaked to be a 3/5th rule as desired by Dan Patrick. According to the Quorum Report, the Senate has put off deciding its rules till tomorrow, with Patrick saying he doesn’t have the votes to make his preferred change. However, it strikes me as entirely plausible that certain legislation, such as a voter ID bill, will be exempted from the 2/3 rule, as was the case last year. We’ll know soon enough.

– Finally, for those of you who are wondering what life is like in the alternate universe where Bill White was elected Governor, here’s an email he sent out to his campaign mailing list:

The Texas comptroller announced yesterday that next year’s state budget shortfall, already tens of billions of dollars, will be $4.3 billion more because Texas has been running an operating deficit for its last two fiscal years. Cuts of twenty to thirty percent in higher education are being discussed in Austin right now.

Please click on this link to an article describing why improved and more accessible higher education is critical to the future of Texas and showing where Texas ranks relative to other states and countries: DMN: Employment growth and higher education by Bill White.

For the first time, young Texans are less educated than the generation of their parents. Cuts in public universities and community colleges will hurt Texas’ long run competitiveness for high wage jobs, where we have already fallen behind at current funding levels. More detail can be found in the 2009 Report of The Select Commission on Higher Education and Global Competitiveness.

You can share your concern by writing or emailing your local newspaper expressing your views on the importance of investing in education. Texas is a great state with great people and prospects. And certainly we can always spend public money more efficiently. But we should not miss the opportunity to prepare for a future with better education and training, resulting in rising incomes and greater opportunities.

So now you know. Not a whole lot else of interest is likely to happen until committee assignments are given out, so we get a little bit of calm before the storm. After that, the level of action will make “Deadliest Catch” look like a paddleboat ride at Hermann Park. Buckle up now and get ready.

UPDATE: Adding in a few opening day emails, from the Texas League of Conservation Voters, Planned Parenthood of the Gulf Coast, and Equality Texas. In addition, here are a couple of worthwhile press releases that respond to Governor Perry’s wacked-out priorities. First, from State Rep. Mike Villarreal:

Today Rep. Mike Villarreal expressed his dismay and concern about Governor Rick Perry’s official proclamation giving emergency status to divisive immigration legislation.

This rare first-day move by the Governor allows the Legislature to take up immigration within the first 60 days of the legislative session. The decision to put immigration legislation on the front burner ignores the true emergency faced by the Texas Legislature – the $27 billion shortfall announced by Comptroller Susan Combs the day before the session opened.

“Once again, the Governor demonstrates that he is a masterful politician.” said Rep. Villarreal. “Just when the public begins to learn that the state’s financial crisis is worse than California’s, he distracts us with a controversial issue that ultimately cannot be resolved by the state.”

“Texans deserve a state government that puts responsible governance over scoring political points,” Rep. Villarreal said. “Doesn’t he know the election is over? He won. Now it’s time for him take responsibility for our schools, our jobs, and the financial crisis he helped create.”

And from State Rep. Armando Walle:

Today State Representative Armando Walle (D-Houston) was sworn in to the Texas House of Representatives for his second term. After hearing Governor’s Perry’s call for emergency action on eminent domain and sanctuary cities, Rep. Walle released the following statement:

“The most pressing issue facing the Texas legislature is addressing the $27 billion shortfall that the Republican leadership has created and failed to address. Balancing the budget on the backs of uninsured children, the elderly, and hardworking everyday Texans is not the kind of approach that will make Texas stronger for future generations. The Republicans are driving the car, and we need to work together to get it out of the ditch. Running over the most vulnerable Texans is not the way to move Texas forward.

I find it very ironic that the Governor who brought you toll roads and Trans-Texas Corridor is calling to strengthen private property rights. We will face many challenges in the 82nd Session, and we must be guided by sound policy, not political pandering.

The call to address sanctuary cities is nothing more than a divisive political ploy aimed at distracting Texans from our state’s budget crisis. Law enforcement officers across the state understand that crime victims and witnesses are their most important resources for solving crimes. We cannot afford to alienate anyone who could be of assistance in solving crimes. The immigration system is broken and the federal government needs to act. And that should be our message to the federal government, so we can focus on the very real and challenging task of balancing our budget to build a stronger Texas.”

The Trib has more.

Related Posts:

2 Comments

  1. […] which I believe is the norm, then that’s what we’ll get this session as well. This is what I expect to happen, but we’ll see. Burka has […]

  2. […] illegal aliens could steal if they wait any longer. As for the balanced budget nonsense, beyond the economic illiteracy of the idea, I will simply note that for some reason, this was not considered an emergency in 2003, […]

Bookmark and Share