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So long, Skylane Apartments

This is happening in my neighborhood, and it’s already generated a lot of interest from the locals.

Elan Heights, from Swamplot

The aging Skylane Central apartments, perched near the entrance of the Woodland Heights neighborhood, are headed for demolition as a developer makes plans to replace the building with an upscale rental complex.

Charleston, S.C.-based Greystar is under contract to purchase the property, a low-rise complex built in 1960. Less than two acres, the site is just north of Interstate 10, off the Taylor Street bridge and across from White Oak Bayou.

The sale is expected to close in September, said Trent Conner, managing director of Greystar in Houston.

The project is the latest example of the rapid redevelopment of old apartment sites in highly desirable areas close to downtown.

The Greystar project, called Elan Heights, is still in the planning stages, but one of the scenarios being considered is an eight-story building with around 250 apartments and attached parking. The building would have a contemporary design encompassing an array of materials, including wood, metal panels, glass and stucco. Houston-based architecture firm Meeks & Partners is designing it.

“We’re hoping to improve the site and improve the curb appeal as you enter the Woodland Heights,” Conner said.

The new property will be an upgrade from what’s there now.

The existing apartments at 2222 White Oak have 76 units.

“I think there are some in the community that look forward to a change with the property the Skylane apartments are on,” said David Jordan, president of the Woodland Heights Civic Association.

Swamplot has the rendering you see above. The reactions I’ve seen to this in various places basically boils down to the following:

1. Happiness to see the Skylane disappear. As one Swamplot commenter notes, this also almost certainly also means the demise of the Little Buddy convenience store and the Mango Beach nightclub. Though I haven’t seen any mention of this elsewhere, I doubt the neighborhood will be sorry at that news, either.

2. Concern about the size of the proposed new building. Eight stories is pretty tall. Other than the townhomes on Usener, who as another commenter noted will likely lose their unobstructed view of downtown, there aren’t any other residences abutting this property. As such, I doubt this concern will mutate into opposition to the project.

3. Amazement that the developer could get a permit, considering that the Skylane flooded like crazy during TS Allison. I’m sure the first two or three stories of the new structure will be parking, so it’s only cars that will be at risk. I hope the future residents of this know what they’re getting into, and that their insurance is up to the task.

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4 Comments

  1. Steve Colvin says:

    4. Concerns about impact on drainage of the minor waterway that sits on the north side of lower White Oak.

  2. sara says:

    Hang on – Mango Beach is a tiny walk up snow cone and smoothie shop. I’ll miss it (as will a lot of us) if it gets the ax.

  3. Blake says:

    What Sara said – anyone who thinks Mango Beach is a nightclub needs to do some raspa research. Who offered that comment? Someone who drove through the neighborhood once a few years ago and maybe sort of remembers some stuff about it?

  4. [...] here for the background. This is the only example of a developer doing this sort of thing cited in the [...]

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