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Who judges the judges?

Meet the guy that’s been going after judges with behavioral issues.

The photograph at the top of Greg Enos’ monthly email newsletter is always the same: A pack of mongooses confronting a reared-up cobra.

The Webster family lawyer says the image is a symbol of a change he aims to kindle in the Houston-area legal community – at least in family courts.

“I do not expect to win every case,” Enos writes at the end of most newsletters. “I just want an efficient system in which my client gets a fair hearing by a judge who works hard, knows the law and does not play favorites.”

The newsletter Enos started nearly three years ago, titled the International Journal on the Reform of Family Courts or The Mongoose for short, has been one tool in his quest. Criminal complaints filed against judges have been another.

The 53-year-old Austin native’s criminal complaint last year against Galveston County Judge Christopher Dupuy preceded an investigation by the state attorney general and multiple indictments related to judicial misconduct that led to the judge’s suspension and eventual resignation.

Enos’ next target is 311th state District Court Judge Denise Pratt, a Republican family court judge first elected in 2010, whom he has accused of falsifying court records in an effort to cover up tardy rulings.

See here for the background on that. It’s far too early to know if the complaints about Judge Pratt have any legs, but they do seem to be getting attention. Of interest is that with each judge, Enos documented cases for criminal prosecution, rather than just file complaints with the State Commission on Judicial Conduct.

Enos also sent his complaint to the State Commission on Judicial Conduct, but described the move as a formality, calling the commission “worthless” based on its response to the Dupuy complaint.

“I don’t expect them to take any action because they wouldn’t in his case,” Enos said.

The SCJC proved to be largely worthless during the Sharon Keller debacle of 2010, so one can hardly blame Enos for seeking alternate paths to justice.

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