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Uber goes rogue

That sound you hear is me shaking my head.

At least one ride-sharing company has decided to openly defy city law that bans its unlicensed drivers from charging for rides.

While a few free-ride promotions remain ongoing, Uber spokeswoman Nairi Hourdajian confirmed Tuesday that the service, which connects interested riders with willing drivers via smartphone apps, is indeed charging for rides and will “stand by” any drivers who receive city citations.

“The support of city users and drivers has been absolutely tremendous.” Hourdajian said. “There have been tens of thousands of trips in Houston in the time we’ve been here, and we’re thrilled by that reception.”

She said the growing use of the service since its launch in February is a sign Houstonians think City Council should “have a sense of urgency” in approving regulatory revisions that would allow legal operation for Uber, Lyft and similar mobile-centric operators.

A draft of possible changes will be reviewed early next week by a joint committee on transportation and public safety. How quickly that proposal moves to the full City Council for a vote depends on suggested changes from concerned council members and taxi industry officials.

Jim Black, executive vice president of governmental relations for Lyft, said he was unaware of plans for the service to mimic Uber and begin regular, for-fee operations before council’s decision. He did note that the Houston Lyft app still offers riders the option to donate to their drivers.

In other cities, the company has swapped out that feature for fees once legal wrangling has been resolved.

See here, here, and here for the background. I mean, seriously, Uber. You’re going to get what you want soon enough. The Chronicle editorial board continues to be on your side. Could you just chill a little? I’m going to let William Shatner speak for me here:

I’m sure I speak for many people when I say I’ll be glad when this matter has been dealt with.

On a related matter, the Express News has a brief update on the lawsuit filed against Uber and Lyft by the cabbies:

The 23 plaintiffs that filed the lawsuit April 8 — among them, two taxi companies from San Antonio including the city’s largest, Yellow Cab San Antonio — have asked a federal judge to rule the companies are violating vehicle-for-hire ordinances in San Antonio and Houston. They are also seeking a temporary restraining order and injunction to prevent Lyft and Uber from operating.

But an injunction has not yet been issued. A hearing on the matter could be scheduled soon, said Michael A. Harris, one of two Houston-based attorneys representing the plaintiffs.

A pre-trial conference has been scheduled for July 18 in U.S. District Court in Houston.

I’ll be glad when this is over, too. Texpatriate has more.

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