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More on stadium netting

Here’s an update on that little girl who was hit by a foul ball at Minute Maid park recently.

A 25-month-old girl who suffered a fractured skull when struck by a foul ball at an Astros game last month continues to recover from her injuries, and her family has hired a prominent Houston attorney to consult with the Astros about the matter.

In a letter addressed Wednesday to Astros owner Jim Crane, attorney Richard Mithoff provided the first public details about the child who was hit in the head May 29 by a line drive off the bat of Chicago Cubs outfielder Albert Almora Jr. during a game at Minute Maid Park.

While no legal action has been filed, attorneys say Mithoff’s letter represents the first public overture to the Astros toward conversations that could lead to a financial settlement.

It also satisfies, for now, the public’s interest in the condition of the crying child who was photographed being carried toward a ballpark exit by her grandfather as Almora slumped behind the plate in distress after seeing the ball hit the child.

“The family wanted to thank everyone for their concern, and that was first and foremost,” Mithoff said. “Secondly, we wanted to see whether any conversations can take place that can lead to a discussion of options that would make sense for the fans and the ballparks and the clubs.

“I know Jim Crane and know him to be a responsible owner, and I think he will do the right thing.”

[…]

The Astros, meanwhile, said Tuesday that they are studying options for additional netting but at this point have no plans to make any additions at Minute Maid Park during the 2019 season.

See here for the background. There’s more on the girl’s condition and what the family is asking for in the article, so read the rest. I really hope the Astros do the right thing and extend their nets to the foul poles. Three teams have already pledged to do this, with the White Sox being the first to make an announcement. The Dodgers made their move after a fan was injured at their stadium. No need to wait for that to happen at your stadium, other teams. This now slightly outdated list shows the netting status at your team’s home. Feel free to tell them that you want them to care for your safety and the safety of your fellow fans.

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5 Comments

  1. Corey Olomon says:

    I totally agree there should be extended netting, but I think the reason of the slow pace is that teams are afraid it will hurt ticket sales. The hope of catching a ball is a factor in some people going to the game instead of watching it on TV.

  2. Corey Olomon says:

    I totally agree there should be extended netting, but I think the reason of the slow pace is that teams are afraid it will hurt ticket sales. The hope of catching a ball is a factor in some people going to the game instead of watching it on TV.

  3. Bill Daniels says:

    “….her family has hired a prominent Houston attorney to consult with the Astros about the matter.”

    Consult = Extort.

    Getting hit with a foul ball is an assumed risk you assume for yourself and your children when you go to the ballpark. The Astros shouldn’t pay a dime for this. I’m sure the family bought medical insurance for their child, being loving parents, and that health insurance should be paying the bills for her injury. If the Astros wanted to be good sports (pun intended) about it, they might offer to pay for the family’s out of pocket deductibles.

    Of course, extortion makes me feel a lot less sympathetic for the girl’s family. I guess they wouldn’t want me on a jury.

  4. Ross says:

    @Bill, are you saying you wouldn’t consult with an attorney if you child suffered an injury in that situation? It’s a reasonable thing to do, if only to make sure all bases are covered. Besides, most folks lack the negotiating skill to deal with an organization like the Astros without assistance.

    If it goes to court, the Astros could very well lose, since the injury was foreseeable, and there was a mitigation available.

  5. John says:

    Ross

    google “assumption of risk” and “baseball rule” the family can’t sue etc. I am sure the Astros will help with medical but beyond that the family can’t get too much.

    John